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Brits living longer, especially men

International 05 Feb, 2020 Follow News

UK’s old people live longer

When it comes to long and healthy lives, residents of the UK have increased significantly in the last few decades.

Statistics from the Office for National Statistics show that life expectancy changes in recent years have shown men are catching up to women, who have historically lived longer because of biological advantages and safer lifestyles.

Improvements in life expectancy have slowed in recent years but it has risen dramatically since the 1970s.

Women live longer than men all over the world for various reasons – among them, that oestrogen naturally lowers cholesterol so puts females at a lower risk of heart diseases and stroke.

Women also tend to be more health-conscious so less likely to put off getting medical help and, in the past, traditionally worked in less dangerous jobs.

Expectancy improvements are slowing down, recent data has shown, after decades of gains brought on by medical advances, falling smoking rates and improvements in public and workplace health and safety.

“There is no simple answer to why life expectancy growth is moving at a slower pace than a decade ago,” David Sinclair, director of the International Longevity Centre UK think-tank said.

“Some argue government austerity, or the social care crisis are to blame, others point to a slowdown in improvements to certain age-related diseases.

“But underneath these headline rates lies another much deeper and more urgent scandal – the vast inequalities in life expectancy.

“The most deprived group of men live nine fewer years than the least deprived. And despite living less long, this group spends more time in poor health.”


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